San Francisco: The City by the Bay

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Our food walk day. ūüôā

We went to Mama’s for breakfast. We were there by 8:30 and only had to wait in line for IMG_2643an hour! Mama’s is a must visit when we’re in SF. The portions are generous and the food is delicious. I had the Florentine Scramble which is scrambled eggs (they must be delicious, since I don’t do eggs, and I reallllllly don’t do scrambled eggs), with spinach, bacon, red onion, and cheese. Also potatoes, and a toasted sour dough baguette. I barely made a dent in all that food. To the extent that the waitress asked if I likedIMG_2645¬†it when she took away my plate. I assured her it was very good!

After breakfast, we went back to our hotel, took a little rest, then regrouped for the next foray. We rode the bus down to the Sutro Baths. We had visited there a couple of years ago, but I wasn’t able to walk around and see everything up close and this time was my opportunity. The area has some amazing history attached to it.

After exploring and being wind blown, we made our way to the nearby Cliff House where we shared some snacks as a late lunch. Then we rode the bus back to the city center, walked to¬†Lemonade for … what else? some lemonade!

Then to the Marriott Hotel for our usual visit to their View Lounge.¬† It used to be called the Sky Lounge, (or Skyy??) but now it’s the View. Our waitress there was awe. SOME! She took excellent care of us and was charming and fun! We can’t wait to go back just to enjoy her company. Anyway, drinks, more snacks, and watching the construction of the building nearby took some time. It was fascinating to watch the crane operator. That also necessitated debating and looking up crane operator salaries in San Francisco.

Back to our hotel then. We had leftovers from Luisa’s and snacks from our first night that we put out, but let’s be honest. We’d been snacking all day. No one was really “hungry.” After we ate, we went to the hotel’s restaurant and enjoyed some live music. A jazz group was playing.

We decided to sleep in the next morning, Wednesday, and go to Dottie’s True Blue Cafe, another staple of SF visits, for breakfast. And it’s a good thing I decided to look at the menu first thing Wednesday morning, because I discovered that they’re closed on Wednesdays.

Quick change of plans and we instead went to Lori’s Diner, where we had a coupon for 20% off. The food was good and hearty, the service excellent, but it just wasn’t Dottie’s.

After breakfast, our destination was the Walt Disney Family Museum. Another first for Dave and me. We rode a couple of busses to get there. It’s on the grounds of the old Presidio. It’s phenomenal. We spent several hours there. It’s truly a museum dedicated to the origins of Walt Disney and his family. It begins with his ancestors’ migration from France and Ireland. It’s laid out and organized extremely well. I loved it. I soon gave up trying to read everything, because there is just so much detail. I didn’t realize that Walt was only 65 when he died. What a loss to the creative world …

IMG_2585Another bus ride and we were closer to the Fisherman’s Wharf area and we stopped at the famous Buena Vista Cafe for Irish Coffees. Tony had started a group text before the trip with a link to an article about the cafe and their coffees and the bartender who’s served five million of them.

The experience did not disappoint. We all enjoyed the coffee and shared some fries as sustenance before we walked down to Fisherman’s Wharf for dinner at Boudin’s on Pier 39.¬†Dave and I shared clam chowder in a bread bowl and it was as delicious as expected.

Then our little group headed to the highlight of the trip which was a wine tasting bay cruise. Such a fun evening! The cruise was two hours long. IMG_4291It included 5 tastings, plus a bonus “welcome aboard,” taste. The weather was pretty windy and chilly, so we didn’t spend much time outside on the deck. The first 30-40 minutes were pretty rough as we sailed toward the Golden Gate. But once we reached the bridge and turned around, everything was delightful! The water smoothed out. People could walk to the bar for their additional pours. (Instead of having to stagger from post to post, grasping their glass, afraid to let go of either.)

The crew was personable and fun. The customers could join the captain and take pictures behind his station.

From the Golden Gate, we then sailed to the Bay Bridge, to Oracle Park and McCovey Cove. There are blankets on board, if it’s really cold. The whole cruise was wonderful and I highly recommend it!

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We docked at 9:00, walked to a nearby cable car stop and waited for our turn to ride back to the stop near our hotel. By then, we only had about half an hour to enjoy the last of the

night’s jazz musician’s in the hotel restaurant, but it was a great ending to a wonderful day in San Francisco.

And alas, it was the end of our trip. We had to fly out of Fresno at 4:00 the next day,Thursday. Which meant we had to be at the airport by 2:30, leaving our house by 2. We had to do laundry and I had some work to do, so we needed to leave by 7:30 the next morning.

So we said our farewells Wednesday evening, after the jazz musicians finished their set. (Quick interruption–one of them came over to chat–asked us where we were from–turns out he plays sometimes with the Sons of the San Joaquin–Fresno’s pre-eminent cowboy singing group.)

We had a wonderful three full days and two partial days in San Francisco. We loved every minute and we’re so grateful to our generous friends for sharing their lodging with us.

I’m almost up to real time now! I’ll try to get caught up tomorrow. Or the next day …

 

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The Adventure: Day 14

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Going to bed early last night helped (as did changing from Eastern to Central time). We woke before 7 AM, and were ready for breakfast when the hotel served it at 7:30. We checked out, hooked up, and hit the road at 8:45 AM.

IMG_2458Our destination was Austin, Minnesota, home of the SPAM Museum. So we could visit Monday morning before we head to Morgan, MN, home of the Farm Fest, to deliver the RALICares Trailer to its next venue.

I know. We were in Springfield, Illinois. Birthplace of Abraham Lincoln for 18 hours and couldn’t fit in a museum or historically significant site. (Although we ate a Horseshoe!) But we made it a point to be in Austin with time to visit the museum that pays homage to pickled/preserved/processed meat products. Believe me, I’m shaking my head in disbelief too.

Anyway … the journey started off easier. There was no cross wind, so we stayed in our lane without much effort.

Illinois is full of corn and soybeans and it’s green and beautiful.

After a few hours, we moved into Iowa.

Iowa is full of corn and soybeans and it’s green and beautiful.

I downloaded a Love’s Travel Center App and a Pilot/Flying J App so we could find gas IMG_2460easily on the road. We stopped for gas at a Flying J that had a Denny’s attached so we had lunch there. We’ve done enough road trips that we know when we need to take a break. We can’t do ten hour days without getting cranky with each other.

After lunch we changed from a generally northerly direction to a generally westerly direction. And the winds picked up. And staying in our own lane got progressively more challenging. I didn’t think of it until it was too late, but I will be taking pictures and video of Dave wrestling with the steering wheel to keep us going straight and in our own lane.

We crossed the Illinois River and the Mississippi River. We crossed several other rivers, many creeks and lakes. There are fewer animals/livestock than we’d expected. We’ve seen a few horses. One or two herds of cows. A few sheep. But honestly, I think I see more livestock between our house in Madera Ranchos and Fresno than I’ve seen here in the last week in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota combined. And I’m not exaggerating.

IMG_2463Last night, Dave looked at my Google maps app route to Austin and decreed it unacceptable. The last hour or so appeared to be on a county highway. He decided he’d rather take a longer route and stick to state highways/freeways. Which is fine. After our experience last Sunday, I get it.¬†

But … today, as we drove, I continually cross-checked our route with Google maps and the CoPilot app, comparing the times, making sure we were okay with the length and weight of the trailer. And the biggest factor, to me … David’s favored state highway route added an hour to our day. And it was a more westerly route. We’d been fighting those cross-winds for a couple of hours already and we were both exhausted. He felt like he’d been arm-wrestling Lurch and I was the nervous passenger, afraid we were about to be blown off the road and only maimed, not immediately killed. (I’d rather go quickly, not linger.)

I brought up the two different routes on my phone, pointed out the differences to the driver. One was shorter and more northerly (meaning less cross winds). He agreed to IMG_2464change his previously decided route. Whew.

It worked out perfectly. The Google suggested route was definitely more rural, county highway-ish, but it was beautifully scenic, very little wind, and so much easier than the longer route someone wanted to take.

We arrived at our Austin hotel as rain started to fall. We got inside and check in before it turned into a full tornado warning. We ate our leftovers from last night and from lunch, then Dave turned on the television. Yep. A tornado warning for real. He went to the front desk, confessed to being a Californian. “We know what to do in an earthquake. What do we do in a tornado?” The front desk clerk did a good job hiding her grin, but basically said, “You’ll feel it coming. Just go into the center hallway and hunker down. But we don’t expect anything.”¬†Sure. Until you do.

We’re in for the night. The SPAM Museum opens at 9 AM. I guess we’ll be there. Then we’ll head to the venue for the Farm Fest, in Morgan, MN to deliver the trailer. It’s a little over two hours away.

Then Dave and I go on to Minneapolis. We’ll fly home in the next day or two. We’ll be home for a week or so (for a previously scheduled vacation). We’ll be back with the RALICares trailer in Des Moines¬†for the Iowa State Fair on August 9th.

Hmmm … Fair Fare …

Apparently the regional food of Iowa is a Maid Rite sandwich. We’ll definitely look up that one!

The Adventure: Day 6

Saturday, July 20, 2019. Day 6.

The usual Holiday Inn Express Breakfast. We’re near a big sports center, so there are a lot of teenage athletes here for various tournaments. We’ve seen baseball players and basketball players, male and female, here. They load up on the breakfast, shovel it in, and stumble back out.

After breakfast, we took a walk. We found out there’s a park right behind our hotel with IMG_2261a short path connecting the two. We walked about a mile, wandering some really lovely trails as well as a IMG_2260wide asphalt road. There was a swing overlooking a creek, so we sat for a moment, enjoying the green and the water.

 

Back at the hotel, we looked up the nearest truck wash and decided that was today’s project. After hooking up the truck and trailer, (our second time on our own–it’s getting easier), putting the address into my phone, we headed north.

Dave had talked to a couple of friends yesterday who had experience pulling trailers and he’d made a couple of adjustments. He felt better about how the truck and trailer felt today, compared to our trip here on Thursday. I could also feel the difference. We felt more stable, there was less swaying/fishtailing. So thank you, guys!

The scenery on the way was beautiful! Green. Lots of corn. Small farms. Small towns. We passed a small executive airport. An old cemetery. Lots of brick homes. I normally read while we’re driving, but not today.

On our way to the truck wash, we saw a Menard’s. We’d been told it was the local place to go for hardware. Kind of a cross between Home Depot and Fresno Ag. We pulled in and made our purchases. Some more boards for letting the trailer rest on when it’s unhooked. Some towels for wiping ourselves down after hooking up (have I mentioned the heat and humidity?) Dave needed a few minor supplies (washers, a drill bit). Then back to the truck.

We found the truck wash, about thirty minutes away from our hotel, without any trouble. We had to wait a few minutes for them to finish up the garbage truck ahead of us. They didn’t offer a towel off or drying service, so we hopped on the nearby freeway, hoping to blow off the worst of the water and reduce spotting. We only went a few miles and quickly turned around. The winds had picked up, so we didn’t feel quite as stable as earlier.

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By then, it was 2:00 and we were hungry. Again. How odd. Considering we’d had breakfast 6+ hours earlier, walked a mile, hooked up a trailer in 80% humidity and driven 30 miles.

There was a Steak & Shake back by the truck wash, so we exited there and parked. Steak & Shake had been on our radar to try so it was meant to be. Except we seemed to have caught them at the end of a rush. We waited about fifteen minutes for a table. It was worth it. The burgers were really good. They advertise steak in the burgers (of course) and they did have a great flavor, a nice char, and the toppings were fresh and there was a wide variety to choose from. We were so hungry, I forgot to take a picture. We both had a pretty basic burger. I had a single cheeseburger. Dave had a double bacon cheeseburger. We shared some fries. We were less impressed with the fries. We agreed the burger can easily hang with an In ‘n Out, but In ‘n Out’s fries are far superior. Dave had coleslaw which he also liked and compared to KFC’s. And since we were at Steak &¬†Shake,¬†well … it’s in the name, so we had to. We chose the Reese’s Chocolate Peanut Butter shake and it was amazing. Thick, chocolatey and peanut buttery. Alas, no picture of that either.

Because of the trailer, our trainers had recommended we use a different map app. One that would tell us if there were roads we couldn’t take the trailer down. I decided to use that app for the way back to the hotel, since I already knew the way. It was incredibly annoying. My phone is synced to the truck’s stereo/navigation system. We had the radio on, but instead of interrupting the radio to tell us something the app would just stop the radio, tell us the info and not return to the radio. Argh. Then when it was time to get off the freeway, it gave contradictory information and we missed our exit. The written directions said to take Exit 129B, but the map (and the street we knew we were on said we should have taken 129A). I was looking at the written directions, so we missed it and had to be rerouted. By then, I was D.O.N.E. with that app and opened my trusty Google Maps. I have a lovely British female voice give me directions and she immediately told me exactly where to exit and turn around. I closed the annoying app.

Except it refused to close! I exited the thing. I did the swipe up to close. I did everything I know to exit/close/shutdown an app, short of restarting my phone. So we had my lovely British Google Maps friend directing us, as well as a rude, mechanical-voiced harpy telling us to “TURN AROUND NOW.”

We managed to tune her out and made it back to the hotel, albeit a bit frazzled. We parked and proceeded to unhook. Dave said to time him, so I set the stopwatch.

We did it together (sort of–he does the heavy lifting) and did it in just shy of ten minutes. Then we got back to our room and collapsed. It was 4:00. It took us pretty much all day to get one 32′ trailer washed. Oh, and it’s covered in water spots. So, it’s not ready for its television appearance on Monday.

Sigh.

 

 

The Adventure: Day 4

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Today was pretty low key. Mostly.

We did move hotels. Which involved moving the trailer. Which meant Dave and Carrie were alone for the first time and solely responsible for hooking up, driving, and IMG_2212unhooking the trailer from the truck.

We did it!

We’re alive. The trailer and the truck are unscratched and unscathed. Whew!

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Those miniature people are us!

We requested a late check-out at the first hotel. I have to give a shout out to the Indianapolis Holiday Inn Express Airport West, on Rockville Road. The staff there are incredible! Devonesha at the front desk and Julia: Wonderful! Kevin and Robert: Amazing! Gayla in the breakfast room: super sweet and so helpful! We hated saying goodbye to them, but we needed to be closer to our venue for next week.

So just before 2:00 we loaded up our luggage, attached the trailer to the truck, and pulled out. There were some prayers sent heavenward–not gonna lie–but we made it safely to the new hotel.

We had just enough time to check in, unhook, (and I took a quick shower because–OMWord!!–have I mentioned the humidity??), and headed out to meet long-time friends from Fresno who relocated to Indianapolis, for dinner. (I no longer refer to anyone as an “old” friend. You’re welcome.)

IMG_2216We had dinner at Bub’s, in Carmel. It was yummy! Dave had an elk burger, while I opted for the familiar, though some would say boring, beef. After dinner we went to Lyndel and Carrie’s home to visit some more. We got to hug their daughter and see two of their grandchildren.

We’re back at the new hotel now and have settled in for the evening.

I think tomorrow’s plan is to figure out our new location and I will do some of my paying work. We hope to find out a firm schedule soon. We know we’re going to be at the Indianapolis Colts Training Camp, but there may be other events before and/or after.

Thanks for reading!

The Adventure: Day 2

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Although technically Day #2 of the Excellent Adventure, Tuesday was our first full day in Indianapolis. It was warm, humid (and I was oh, so glad I abandoned the blow dryer, mousse, flat iron, etc. routine and embraced the frizzy curls). The day got warmer and damper. It rained, sprinkled, and steamed.

Our “trainers,” Joe and Frank, drove the trailer out from Maryland yesterday while we flew from Fresno. But they ran into a truck fire in Ohio and were delayed by several hours and we ended up arriving in Indianapolis before them. So we took a shuttle to the hotel and were in bed Monday night before they arrived.

We met up with them for breakfast, got acquainted, and then went out to the trailer. They showed us how they set up the trailer while I videoed everything. Then each of them gave us a sample “tour.”

We went over all the elements of the trailer, the tour, the pickup truck, the scheduling possibilities. We went shopping for a drill and a gas can. The guys went through the process for unhooking and hooking up the trailer while I again took video.

Then we went to lunch at the place every Californian visits for their first meal out of state: Cracker Barrel.

After lunch, a quick stop at Target, then back to the hotel. Dave and I had planned to watch the videos of the tours, make notes on index cards and review so we’d be ready to give tours ourselves.¬†Someone¬†had the bright idea that¬†someone¬†else should listen to the videos, transcribe them, take them to the business center downstairs, print them out, then the other someone would read them and make his own index cards. So the first¬†someone¬†(that would be¬†me) got to work.

I listened, watched, transcribed, paused, typed, rewound, typed again, for several hours, and I still have quite a bit to go. But I do know how to give a tour of the trailer. I hope to finish transcribing first thing tomorrow so¬†someone else is also ready soon. Joe and Frank leave tomorrow and we’ll be on our own.

We took a break for dinner. Even though we have Olive Garden in Fresno, this was a huge Olive Garden. Much bigger than any OG I’ve been in. And it was very good.

There is still some uncertainty about when we actually start at the Colts Training Camp. There may another event first.

And my phone is recharging after all the video taking and playing so I don’t have pictures to share of the day yet. But soon. I hope.

Dave and Carrie’s Excellent Adventure

I’ve talked about it on Facebook and emailed friends and family. I’ve tweeted and Instagrammed. Now I’m blogging.

Stud Muffin and I are embarking on an endeavor. Part job, part travel opportunity, part adventure, part drug educators.

We’re now part of a group called Code 3 Association. ¬†They build relationships between “Cops & Citizens.” They have a drug education trailer called RALI Cares, that they take to community events. The trailer is outfitted to look like a teenager’s bedroom. They give tours and educate parents and grandparents about where teens might hide drugs. They were looking for a retired law enforcement officer (and spouse) to drive a second trailer. IMG_2176

Enter the Padgetts!

We found house-sitters, hired a lawn service, refilled our prescriptions (we’re old, we take meds), said goodbye to our grandchildren, children, and parents, and packed our suitcases.

We arrived yesterday in Indianapolis and start training¬†today¬†how to pull the 32′ trailer behind the truck and how to give the tours.¬†

Here’s a link to an article about the trailer that was in a New Hampshire paper.

We’re looking forward to experiencing different weather, different food, meeting people, and having new adventures together. And maybe even learning new things and teaching others new things. Maybe impacting lives for good.

It’s been a crazy few weeks. Just over a month ago we first heard about this opportunity and here we are!

I’ll keep tweeting, Facebooking, Instagramming, and blogging. I hope you keep reading!

 

Wednesday Wanderings: Highclere, Jane Austen, Irish Football, and 40 Years Married

Sunday, September 17, 2017 — I probably should have been dating these posts before this one.

We woke up in Newbury, in the Furze Bush Inn. During our Full English¬†breakfast, the innkeeper, Jules, asked what brought us to the area and what we planned to see. I’m a huge Dick Francis fan and I wanted to see the village of Lambourn and the training grounds that are often featured in his books.

 

I’d also wanted to visit Bath and some Jane Austen sites, but Bath was just too far out of the way from the other places we wanted to see. However … the village of Chawton where Jane Austen lived the last few years of her life was in the area and they have a museum in her home.

UK map (2)

 

 

So I told Jules we were headed to Lambourn, then to Chawton. He asked about Highclere (home of Downton Abbey) since it was very close. I had checked into visiting the castle, but it wasn’t open to guests/tours/tourists while we were there. It’s only open limited times. I told him it was closed, but he said we should go by there anyway, it was worth a look from the gates. He mentioned the popularity of Downton Abbey had been a huge boon to the area with the influx of tourists. Jules also encouraged us to find a Sunday carving for dinner. It’s roast beef and is a Sunday tradition in pubs. We didn’t realize Sunday carving dinner is actually lunch.

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A Lambourn racing stable

So we headed out. Lambourn was our first stop. It was a drizzly day, but not a downpour. We found Lambourn easily and drove through the village and along the training grounds which were empty since we were there late morning. We did see a stable that I know was in many of the Francis books. It could have been transported from Lambourn onto the page. I knew it right away. I had never visited Lambourn before, but I’d been there and I’d been in that stable, thanks to Mr. Francis.

 

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A typical road between villages. This is a two-way road.

The scenery was lush and green and beautiful. And the roads and lanes were a bit wider than in Ireland, which helped my¬†driving confidence. Having an automatic transmission helped also. I often thanked the kind employees at the Marriott in my mind. One of them told us story about a tourist from another European country (which I won’t name but you may be able to guess). The employee said he was upgrading him to an automatic. The tourist got angry, and said, “You think I’m lazy like an American?!?!” The employee apologized, changed him back to a standard, and then offered a hybrid vehicle, so he’d get better mileage. That also angered him.

From Lambourn we backtracked a bit and pointed the car towards Highclere. We found it easily and sure enough, the gates were closed. Another car had followed us up the drive. We all got out of our vehicles and approached the gates, eager to see the famous castle. 2017-09-17_12-12-14_513Unfortunately, Jules was a bit over optimistic about what was visible. We could see a curving lane and a security car approaching. I knew he was coming to tell us to leave, so I returned to the car. The other car’s occupants lingered and talked to the security guy. As they came back to their vehicle, they said he’d told them that if they drove to nearby Beacon Hill, there was a short hike that had a great view of the castle. We decided to try it since it seemed silly to come all that way and then leave without a glimpse.

We followed the other car, and parked. They were out of their car and disappeared down the trail while we were making sure our bags were covered, the car was locked up, and so on. We started on the trail and immediately met the others returning to the parking lot. “It’s very muddy. You need proper shoes and to be fit,” one of them said. “We’re not fit.”

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The view from the first hill. You can get an idea of the steep trail we climbed.

We decided to proceed. It was very muddy and a stiff incline. After a hundred yards or so, we went through a gate and instead of mud, it was a grassy hillside to hike up. A¬†very steep and slick hillside. We headed up. That was six months and 66 pounds ago. I made it up, but it wasn’t pretty. I told Dave if, when we reached the top, there was another hill to climb, he could do it on his own.¬†2017-09-17_12-57-02_959

Sure enough, there was. From the top of my hill, I could get a glimpse of the top quarter of the building. Dave went on to the next hill and got a better view and picture before we headed back down.

I think the security guard had a good laugh as we left at his great practical joke. He’d directed those crazy tourists to a strenuous hike with barely a view.

We made it safely back to the car and headed for Chawton. We found the village and the museum pretty easily. Parking was another matter. But there was a pub across the street from the museum and since Stud Muffin isn’t into Jane Austen, we parked in the pub parking lot. He went to the pub, I went to the museum.

Jane Austen lived in Chawton for the final eight years of her life, although her family moved her to Winchester for the last months, hoping her health would improve there. The house in Chawton is now a museum. July 2017 was the 100th anniversary of Austen’s death, and a choir from Winchester had performed at the observance last summer. They happened to be singing again on the day I visited and I was treated to some lovely music in the beautiful gardens. That was a serendipity I was not expecting!

 

After about an hour wandering the house and grounds, I found Stud Muffin at the pub. Our poor phone’s data plans had taken a beating, so I added more data to his phone then we headed out again.

While in Ireland visiting our niece and her family, we’d learned that County Mayo, where they live, were in the Irish Football championships against Dublin. It’s a long and heated rivalry, with Mayo losing far more often than winning. The game was that day, so we put “Sports pub” into our phones and headed to the closest, The French Horn, in Alton.

We found the pub just fine, but they had no sports on and no way to show the game. They suggested the Wheatsheaf. As we headed out the door, a group of three sitting nearby asked if we were good at crosswords. Stud Muffin offered my services to help them finish. They were lacking two answers. With a sigh of relief, I was able to supply one of the answers: Coda. The clue: Ending the music. The other clue I had no idea. This was a real neighborhood pub that welcomed anyone. Even American tourists looking for the Irish Football game.

The Wheatsheaf had televisions and was able to let us watch the last few minutes of the game. County Mayo was winning when we started watching, but they did indeed manage to lose the game. We arrived at the Wheatsheaf at just after four o’clock and the Sunday carving was over. They were out of food. They recommended we try The George, so we headed out again. In case you’re counting, we’ve now been to four pubs in one day. Not drinking, not eating, just visiting.

It was a short walk to the George, and they were serving food, but no Sunday carving. This was our actual 40th anniversary, so we sat and prepared to celebrate.

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Dave had rump steak and I had a burger. The food was excellent and tasty and you could tell they paid attention to it.

One thing we’d learned in pubs is that the wait staff don’t just bring you your tab when you’re done eating. They assume you’re there for the evening and the table is yours. You have to ask for the bill when you’re ready to go. We almost left the George without paying, but we remembered just in time.

We had about a 90 minute drive to our stop for the night in Royal Tunbridge Wells. We wanted to visit Hastings on the coast the next day, so I’d picked a town between Newbury and Hastings, but closer to Hastings. It was after dark when we arrived and it had been a bit stressful driving. But we got there safely. The B&B wasn’t the easiest to find, because the street and houses weren’t clearly marked, but after asking for help from some people leaving the nearby church, we found it. The proprietress asked if we wanted to add breakfast for 8 pounds each. We asked why breakfast wasn’t included. She said AirB&B wouldn’t let her offer breakfast. That still sounds fishy, but we didn’t argue and just declined.

Whew! It was a long day packed full of memories and lovely moments. Thanks for reading this far!

Next week: Hastings, Notting Hill, and Portobello Road. Oh, and checking in the rental car. That may deserve its own post.