The Adventure: Day 16

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Happy Birthday, Amber!

We got up early in Minneapolis, and made it to the airport and through security with just about fifteen minutes to spare before our first flight. Our layover in Salt Lake City was just enough time to run from Terminal C to Terminal E and catch our flight to Fresno.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough time for Dave’s suitcase to make the flight. Mine did. We hope his caught the afternoon flight and will be here this evening sometime.

We will spend the next few days catching up on work and house and yard chores and laundry. We’ll see family and friends and celebrate a birthday or two.

We’ll leave again Sunday for a few days in San Francisco with friends. The Great Adventure blog will resume when we fly from San Francisco to Des Moines on Thursday, August 8th. First stop: The Iowa State Fair! Fair fare!

Thank you so much for reading and commenting and being encouraging!

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The Adventure: Day 15

Monday, July 29, 2019

Another crazy, exhilarating, exhausting day. We left our hotel in Austin, MN and hightailed it to the SPAM museum ASAP as we could. The museum opened at 9 AM and IMG_2469we got there about 9:30.

True confession: I thought we’d be the only ones there, wandering a cavernous building all alone.

David, of course, thought the opposite. We’d be crowded, shoulder to shoulder, shuffled along, already too late to see anything of interest and having to hurry past the exhibits.

Thankfully, the truth was somewhere in between. There were people in the museum, but it wasn’t crowded. And it was more interesting than I expected.

There was lots of history about the Hormel family, how the patriarch started as a butcher and entrepreneur and meat processor and the “empire” started with the Hormel sealed/packaged ham. And then it expanded to the Dinty Moore canned stews, then Jay Hormel wanted to bring chili to the northern states.

SPAM was actually a late comer to the Hormel family (kinda-sorta). IMG_2472I was really impressed how Hormel is still actively seeking to keep their brand relevant and meaningful.

In the last two weeks we’ve been in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota. Dave and I have quizzed each other about what’s unusual in each state. What do we see that’s different? What do we not see that we’re used to seeing at home? One of my comments was the ubiquitous array of trash containers for “Trash,” “Plastic Recyclable,” “Glass Recyclable,” and “Paper/Cardboard Recyclable.” I’ve seen signs reminding me to recycle, but there haven’t been a lot of different containers. Except at the SPAM Museum. They had them all!

Dave had been talking to the staff at the Minnesota Farm Fest about when and where we could drop off the trailer for the event there. While we were wandering the SPAM Museum, he got a call. The woman on the other end of the phone, over 100 miles away, told us we had  to go to the Tendermaid Cafe for lunch and get a hamburger. But it’s not a usual hamburger. It’s a loose meat burger.

Well … when someone, two hours away, calls to make a restaurant recommendation, we listen!

The Tendermaid was less than a block from the SPAM Museum and it opened at 11 AM. We arrived a few minutes after opening and scored a couple of seats at the counter. We IMG_2474had no clue what we were doing or ordering, but we managed to order a “hamburger,” to share and a malt (which we were also told we “had” to order).

When I had researched food in Iowa, the loose meat sandwich popped up, but I didn’t know it was also a thing in Minnesota.  It’s kind of like a Sloppy Joe, but without the sloppy sauce.

The Tendermaid has been serving loose meat burgers for 81 years. Of course Dave wondered why they didn’t have a SPAM burger (insert rolling eye emoji), but I didn’t. They’ve been in business nearly as long as SPAM has been around. Who knew SPAM was going to be a thing 80 years later? The Tendermaid found their wheelhouse and stuck with it.

The diner is super small. The steamer/cooker is the original (i.e. 81 years old!).IMG_2477 The staff  comes in at about 9 am and start cooking/steaming the meat and breaking it up. We ordered a hamburger. Dave watched when an order for a cheeseburger came in. The waitress/cook scraped together a bunch of meat, laid down a slice of cheese, pulled more meat on topIMG_2479 … let it sit a minute, then pulled it all onto a bun.

Made me wish we’d ordered a cheeseburger! Actually, we did. We ordered a Western Bacon Cheeseburger to-go for the guy we were meeting at the Minnesota Farm Fest to drop off the trailer. Someone who called and made the recommendation might have agreed with a question about should we bring a loose meat burger from the Tendermaid.

🙂

IMG_2480By noon-ish, we were headed to the Farm Fest site to drop off the trailer. And, once again, the winds were in full force. If we could just drive a truck and pull a trailer, everything would be great, but the winds! I can’t post videos on this blog (I’m cheap and haven’t upgraded yet), so check out my Facebook page for the 60 second video I took of Dave wrestling with the steering wheel, wind, and drafting vehicles.

We dropped off the trailer (and a gift of SPAM and a loose meat burger) at the Farm Fest venue and headed to our hotel near the Minneapolis-St.Paul airport. Surprisingly, for two Californians, we’ve actually been to this part of Minnesota before. We both came for the American Christian Fiction Writers conference in 2009 and I came for a deep/intensive/OMWord-I-can’teven-writers-conference a year or two later. But for both of those events, we/I saw: the Minneapolis-St.Paul Airport/The Mall of America/the venue hotel. And, sadly, this visit to Minneapolis doesn’t seem to be shaping up to be much different. We checked into our hotel a little after 6 pm.

Dave cleaned up the truck. We’re across the street from a strip mall, so he asked the front desk staff for a recommendation. He told them we were Californians, so they steered us away from the Mexican restaurant. We went to the “bar and grill.” While we were there, I researched the parking options at the airport. I’d assumed we’d leave the truck at the Long-term parking for our boss to pick up when he got into town in about a week.

That made sense. Until … the regular “Long Term” parking said the clearance is 6 foot …something. Given our experience last week,  we’re not willing to park there. So we (I) went looking for other options. There is another choice for long-term parking, And! they offer a 7′ clearance … but … you have to use the same credit card for entry and exit. Well  … that won’t work since we’re leaving the truck and someone else is picking it up.. 

Sigh …

We went to front desk and asked if they offered a “Park and Fly” option. They do. With shuttles to and from the airport. For the time we need … $60. The other options at the airport were going to be double that. At least.

We called our boss. He agreed to go with the Park and Fly. So … we’re in our room. We’ve got to get up earlier than we’d expected to get the shuttle to the airport.

We’ll be home around noon tomorrow. Probably stinking. Unshaven (both of us — no judging, okay!?!?).

We have some family and work and medical appointments to take care of the rest of the week. Sunday, we leave for an already planned vacation with friends. We’ll fly out of San Francisco (we think) to Des Moines for the Iowa State Fair (Deep-Fried Butter? More Loose Meat Sandwiches?) on August 8th. After the fair, we’re scheduled to move the trailer to Colorado.

But … as we’ve learned … stay tuned … who knows what’s next?? We don’t … only God …

 

The Adventure: Day 14

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Going to bed early last night helped (as did changing from Eastern to Central time). We woke before 7 AM, and were ready for breakfast when the hotel served it at 7:30. We checked out, hooked up, and hit the road at 8:45 AM.

IMG_2458Our destination was Austin, Minnesota, home of the SPAM Museum. So we could visit Monday morning before we head to Morgan, MN, home of the Farm Fest, to deliver the RALICares Trailer to its next venue.

I know. We were in Springfield, Illinois. Birthplace of Abraham Lincoln for 18 hours and couldn’t fit in a museum or historically significant site. (Although we ate a Horseshoe!) But we made it a point to be in Austin with time to visit the museum that pays homage to pickled/preserved/processed meat products. Believe me, I’m shaking my head in disbelief too.

Anyway … the journey started off easier. There was no cross wind, so we stayed in our lane without much effort.

Illinois is full of corn and soybeans and it’s green and beautiful.

After a few hours, we moved into Iowa.

Iowa is full of corn and soybeans and it’s green and beautiful.

I downloaded a Love’s Travel Center App and a Pilot/Flying J App so we could find gas IMG_2460easily on the road. We stopped for gas at a Flying J that had a Denny’s attached so we had lunch there. We’ve done enough road trips that we know when we need to take a break. We can’t do ten hour days without getting cranky with each other.

After lunch we changed from a generally northerly direction to a generally westerly direction. And the winds picked up. And staying in our own lane got progressively more challenging. I didn’t think of it until it was too late, but I will be taking pictures and video of Dave wrestling with the steering wheel to keep us going straight and in our own lane.

We crossed the Illinois River and the Mississippi River. We crossed several other rivers, many creeks and lakes. There are fewer animals/livestock than we’d expected. We’ve seen a few horses. One or two herds of cows. A few sheep. But honestly, I think I see more livestock between our house in Madera Ranchos and Fresno than I’ve seen here in the last week in Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Minnesota combined. And I’m not exaggerating.

IMG_2463Last night, Dave looked at my Google maps app route to Austin and decreed it unacceptable. The last hour or so appeared to be on a county highway. He decided he’d rather take a longer route and stick to state highways/freeways. Which is fine. After our experience last Sunday, I get it. 

But … today, as we drove, I continually cross-checked our route with Google maps and the CoPilot app, comparing the times, making sure we were okay with the length and weight of the trailer. And the biggest factor, to me … David’s favored state highway route added an hour to our day. And it was a more westerly route. We’d been fighting those cross-winds for a couple of hours already and we were both exhausted. He felt like he’d been arm-wrestling Lurch and I was the nervous passenger, afraid we were about to be blown off the road and only maimed, not immediately killed. (I’d rather go quickly, not linger.)

I brought up the two different routes on my phone, pointed out the differences to the driver. One was shorter and more northerly (meaning less cross winds). He agreed to IMG_2464change his previously decided route. Whew.

It worked out perfectly. The Google suggested route was definitely more rural, county highway-ish, but it was beautifully scenic, very little wind, and so much easier than the longer route someone wanted to take.

We arrived at our Austin hotel as rain started to fall. We got inside and check in before it turned into a full tornado warning. We ate our leftovers from last night and from lunch, then Dave turned on the television. Yep. A tornado warning for real. He went to the front desk, confessed to being a Californian. “We know what to do in an earthquake. What do we do in a tornado?” The front desk clerk did a good job hiding her grin, but basically said, “You’ll feel it coming. Just go into the center hallway and hunker down. But we don’t expect anything.” Sure. Until you do.

We’re in for the night. The SPAM Museum opens at 9 AM. I guess we’ll be there. Then we’ll head to the venue for the Farm Fest, in Morgan, MN to deliver the trailer. It’s a little over two hours away.

Then Dave and I go on to Minneapolis. We’ll fly home in the next day or two. We’ll be home for a week or so (for a previously scheduled vacation). We’ll be back with the RALICares trailer in Des Moines for the Iowa State Fair on August 9th.

Hmmm … Fair Fare …

Apparently the regional food of Iowa is a Maid Rite sandwich. We’ll definitely look up that one!

The Adventure: Day 13

Saturday, July 27, 2019

We left Indy about 9:30, a little later than we’d planned, but I wanted to take our time loading up, making sure we didn’t forget anything, and had our bearings. We said a sad farewell to the Holiday Inn Express – Westfield staff. TJ at the front desk, Kym and Leslie in the dining room. They were great and helpful and kind and gracious.

We stopped to fuel up after about half an hour, at a gas station we’d visited last Saturday,

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Illinois

near the truck wash and Steak ‘n Shake. Then we were officially on new and unproven roads.

Pulling this huge trailer is no joke. It’s a giant wind sail. Every gust pulls or pushes us. Trucks that pass us create a draw that feels like an earthquake shaking us.

After an hour and a half, we entered Illinois and gained an hour as we went from Eastern time to Central. The trailer seemed to be swaying a lot so we pulled over at a rest stop (staffed with real people for giving information) and David made a call to an acquaintance for some advice. He left a message and I searched for a hotel on the outskirts of Springfield. I called to be sure they could accommodate the trailer. Then we continued on. 

I passed the time by posting this morning’s entry about yesterday, reading a little, looking at the new scenery, and making sure David didn’t miss any freeway navigation changes.

We needed gas shortly after we passed the last Pilot Travel stop. Of course. I didn’t realize we were that close to empty, until the low fuel warning popped up on the navigation screen. Dave didn’t realize how quickly the truck sucked up fuel, either, since this was our first long distance trip with the trailer.

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Rolls of hay

We still had 50 miles of fuel, and we were about 30 miles from our destination in Springfield, so we were fine, but Dave said to go ahead and find a gas station.

Which I did, in Mechanicsville, about 2 miles off the freeway. I cross-checked the route with our CoPilot app (of course! Lesson learned!) and looked at the gas station from a satellite view. I was pretty sure we could pull in, but not 100%.

We found it and it was close, but we were able to pull in and through. It had high roofs over the pumps, so we were okay. But they didn’t have “Premium,” which the truck needs, so we ended up getting only $10 of gas. We also bought beef jerky for our lunch, and headed back to the freeway.

We planned to find our hotel, drop off the trailer, and go to a Lincoln museum. We found the hotel, which was next to a Tractor Supply Company. Dave went in to ask the manager if we could park there. He brought her out a minute later and introduced me to Kimberly. Her son is an addict and she was very interested in the trailer. We opened it up and while Dave unhooked (she gave enthusiastic permission for us to park there), I showed her the highlights in the trailer. She got a little teary a few times as she recognized and remembered some of the things I pointed out as “red flag indicators.”

While Dave was unhooking, a part of the winch (?? I think that’s what it’s called??) that is used to raise and lower the trailer as it’s hooked and unhooked from the truck, broke. It had broken partway on Thursday, at the farmer’s market, but it broke the rest of the way today. We looked at the TSC store, but they didn’t have a replacement. The part that broke is what made it possible for Dave to use an impact drill to raise and lower the trailer quickly and easily. Luckily (??), we still had the original part for raising and lowering the trailer manually. So he put that part back on. But by then, it was nearly 4:00. Too late to do any sight seeing or museum visiting. We went ahead and checked in.

And I was out of steam. Remember, beef jerky for lunch? It caught up with me. We checked in, went to our room and it was hot in there. The AC wouldn’t come on. So back to the front desk to get a different room.

We finally got a cool room, got our bags in, and collapsed. I did a bit of Googling on “Illinois regional cuisine.” And discovered that a Springfield specialty is the Horseshoe. I found two nearby places that had it on their menus. One was called the Trade Winds Pub

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The Trade Winds–good thing a review said to ignore the outside appearance!

& Eatery. The other was the Engrained Brew Pub. David asked the front desk staff for a recommendation. They hadn’t heard of either one at first. They thought for a minute, then one guy said, “Oh, yeah, that’s a bar!” referring to the Trade Winds, about 3/4s of a mile away.

We headed there, to the Trade Winds first, since it was close, thinking to check it out, then go to Engrained if the Trade Winds didn’t make the cut. We followed my trusty Google Maps and found a deserted-looking hut in the middle of a dusty parking lot. With trepidation, we headed in. One of the reviews I’d seen said, “Don’t be put off by the exterior.” Good thing I’d read that.

Inside it was definitely a bar. Some would call it a dive bar. But it looked clean and the staff was friendly and quick. We didn’t even look at a menu, just asked about the Horseshoe.

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Basically it’s a piece (or two) of Texas toast, with meat, topped with french fries, topped with cheese sauce. The original has hamburger. Now they offer a choice of meats. The waiter said their most popular is the breaded pork tenderloin so that’s what we ordered. He said, “It’s big,” so we knew to order just one and share it.

Big is an understatement. We both ate until we were full, brought some back to the hotel (I think Dave’s planning to have it for breakfast), and we still left quite a bit behind.

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The Horseshoe, after we were both full!

We waddled to the truck, then made it back to the hotel. It’s early to bed for us. Our plan is to hit the road again early tomorrow. Our destination is Austin, Minnesota. It’s six hours and twenty minutes away. Today’s journey was not quite three and a half. So we’re adding another three hours to tomorrow.

No Mr. Lincoln for us. No Springfield sights.

But … we’re scheduled to be back in Illinois in late September/early October. So I know where I want to go! And maybe what to eat.

The Adventure: Day 12

Friday, July 26, 2019

A good recovery day, after the excitement of Thursday.

IMG_2412Dave found a Ford dealer and bought some touchup paint. He consulted the collision department who said paint and clear coat would keep the scratches on the roof from rusting until it could be properly repaired.

I stayed in the hotel room and worked. I got some new words down on a tech writing job, so that’s always good.

We also did some laundry, expecting to hear that we’re done in Indiana and will be leaving tomorrow to take the trailer to Minnesota. That news came at 2:00. It’s a bit sad that we only got to do two events in Indiana and that the Colts Training Camp fell through. Everyone here has been so kind and welcoming. And everyone who’s visited the trailer wants to know where it’s going to be next so they can tell others. When I told a woman at Thursday’s farmer’s market that we were leaving in a day or so, her jaw dropped and she said, “Do you know the statistics for Indiana? Do you know what we have going on here?” We’re hoping to come back next year and spend more time. Or at least the trailer.

After we got the news that we were done in Indy, Dave called our boss to discuss moving the trailer to Minnesota for the Farm Fest. The boss will come to Minnesota for that and we’ll fly home for the first of our previously scheduled vacations.

IMG_2433Then we headed to Carmel, the next town over, to visit the Museum of Miniatures that we had popped into on Wednesday. We spent about an hour there. It’s an amazing place! The attention to detail is incredible, as well as the time invested. Besides houses, there are rooms, vignettes, scenes, exhibits of dolls and collections of miniatures.

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The admission fee is $10 and it’s well worth it. It includes an audio tour that gives additional information about some of the exhibits. I have a writer friend who makes miniatures and I thought of her often during the tour. As well as another friend who loves miniatures also. They both would have been in their element there.

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After looking at all the museum’s offerings, we left to find the elusive Indiana breaded pork tenderloin sandwich. Before we arrived in Indy, I’d Googled, “Indiana state food,” looking for a local specialty cuisine/dish. I found the pork tenderloin sandwich. We chatted with the consultants, and a friend from home who is from Indiana, and they all agreed: when in Indiana, you must have a pork tenderloin sandwich. It has to be breaded, and it has to be old-school, not “bougie.”

So I searched for the best pork tenderloin sandwich around us in Westfield or Carmel. I read lots of reviews. I debated driving thirty minutes to a definite old school place or take a chance on a nearby place with mixed reviews. But we really didn’t have time to drive any distance, and the local place, Muldoon’s, was walking distance from the museum.

It worked out great. We ordered the breaded (not grilled) pork tenderloin sandwich to share and substituted coleslaw for the kettle chips. It was everything everyone said. IMG_2440The pork was tender and delicious. It came with mayonnaise, pickles, and lettuce on the side, and a regular size hamburger bun. I’m not sure how you eat it as a sandwich. We just cut it up and ate it like a chicken-fried steak. Dave asked for mustard, but he didn’t use any. The pork was great as it was. 

We were back to the hotel and in for the night by 5:30. (I know. We’re such party animals!)

We talked about where to go on our way to Minnesota. We’re headed to Springfield, Illinois first. We settled on a route. I watched some of the livestream of the RITA awards (the Oscars for romance books) since I had some friends who were finalists (you all were robbed!). We took a last swim in the pool and got ready for bed and the next stop on the adventure!

Illinois and Minnesota, here we come. I hope we’re ready!

The Adventure: Day 11

I think I should be dating these … Hmmm … I need to go back and edit them.

Thursday, July 25th, turned out to be another crazy, roller coaster day.

It started out fine. The usual breakfast at the hotel. I’m already over the egg choices. The first few days I was fine with the omelets. Most people who know me at all, know I don’t IMG_2395do scrambled eggs. At all. Ever. But I can handle omelets with lots of cheese and other ingredients. But the packaged ones here lost their appeal pretty quickly. I can’t eat sugar on an empty stomach (I get nauseated, clammy, and shaky), so no cinnamon rolls , pancakes with syrup, or sugary cereals. Like most of the country, I avoid carbs (toast/muffins/bagels). Which leaves sausage. Good thing I like sausage and they usually offer both pork and turkey. Sometimes there’s bacon. Sometimes I do have half a biscuit with gravy. One day I did half a bagel with cream cheese. There are enough options that I don’t leave hungry.

Anyway, after breakfast, I did a little work while Dave readied the trailer for our event in the afternoon. We headed out about 11:00 for Lawrence, which is about 25 minutes away. Our venue was a farmer’s market, on the grounds of the former army base, Fort Benjamin Harrison. It’s been converted to other uses. There are restaurants and housing now. A central greenspace hosts a weekly farmer’s market. We arrived, got the directions of where to set up, which involved pulling the trailer up a curb, over a sidewalk and down the grass to the other end of the area. We did that okay, with minimal adjusting. (Meaning Dave only had to back up and pull forward two or three times to get the trailer mostly straight and even with the sidewalk.)

We unhooked, and I ordered lunch from Panera across the street from my app. We grabbed it to go and headed to downtown Indy to meet our consultants/event schedulers to view a venue and decide on its viability for the trailer. It took us a while to find parking. The parking garage we found had a sign that said 6’8″ clearance. It felt like we couldn’t make it, but the attendant at the front watched us enter. He said only the antenna scraped and we’d be okay. So we went in. We parked without mishap and walked to meet the consultants.

From their office, we walked to the nearby venue, City Market. It’s very similar to the Oxbow Market in Napa. Or Chelsea Market in New York. A collection of independent IMG_2398shops under one roof in an older, converted building. We walked quickly through and out, to see their outside area, called a rain garden. There is a lovely plaza with bistro tables, trees, bocce ball courts. And an open area not nearly big enough for our 32′ trailer plus a pickup truck to pull it in. The director told us that they recently hosted a Cirque du Soleil team with their trailer. Except it was only 20′ and took a whole team to position and make 5-point turns. The only other option would be to get a permit from the city to block off a portion of the street and that could take up to a month. We only have a few days.

So we walked back to the consultants’ office, which is on Monument Circle, which circles a monument. Convenient, right? At the center is the Soldiers and Sailors Monument, which was built to honor those who fought in the Civil War and two other previous skirmishes. There is a possibility of getting a permit to park along the circle for a few hours. The consultants will work on that, and hopefully let us know by the end of the day.

IMG_2397They returned to work and we walked over to look at the monument. We paid $2 each to ride the elevator to the top for some amazing 360 degree views of downtown Indianapolis. Then we returned to the parking garage.

This is where the day fell apart. Because contrary to the sign and the attendant, we did not make it out of the garage unscathed. The top of the truck scraped a concrete beam. As soon as we heard the contact, Dave stopped and backed up and attempted a different angle, but a parked car was sticking out pretty far which hindered how he could take that corner. We ended up scrapping pretty significantly. After we exited, he went to find the attendant, who, of course, was on a break. I took pictures. Dave made notes. And we saw another garage across the street with a sign that said 7’3″ clearance. Another @#*%^$#&*@ moment. Why hadn’t we seen that place first??

By the time the attendant came back, we were pressed for time to make it back to Lawrence for the farmer’s market. But he gave us the owner’s name and number, and said he would pass on our information. And we hurried to the freeway.

IMG_2406We got to Lawrence just in time to meet up with the consultants again and to set up. They helped us unload all the boxes (mostly dried out from Monday’s rain) and set up.

We gave lots of tours. We think about 50-60 people went through the trailer. Dave gave a tour to the Lawrence police chief. I gave a tour to the adult sponsor and student captain of their Explorer post. And there were lots of other people. The consultants said they talked to about 150 people. About half of those said they’d seen the trailer on TV. So the media coverage Monday definitely got the word out.

Everyone I took through the trailer was very impressed and thankful and also surprised at how much they learned. And disappointed that this was likely our last Indiana event. They urged us to come back soon. We assured them we want to!

At 7:15, the last tour was over. The market ends at 7. We loaded the boxes back into the trailer, told the consultants goodbye. They promised to have a final answer about another event by the end of business today. IMG_2409

We hooked up again, pulled off the sidewalk and into the road and headed back to the hotel. Got here about 8:30, exhausted. Dave felt like White Castle, so after we unhooked, I collapsed in the room and he made a dinner run.

Then he called our boss to share the trailer news. Not a fun moment. And the fact that the consultants still don’t know if we’re done in Indiana didn’t help. If we’re done, we’re going to move the trailer to its next venue in Minnesota. But if we have to stay for another event, our boss has to get someone else to drive the trailer to Minnesota. We took this job with the understanding that we had two previously scheduled trips we would be going home for. We need to be home August 1. At this point, we don’t know if we’re flying out of Indianapolis or Minneapolis. For people who like a plan, we’re learning to be flexible!

It’s Friday morning now, technically day 12. Dave’s doing laundry again, I’m working. He found a Ford dealer nearby. He’ll go see them soon, to see about getting touchup paint to cover the scratches so they don’t rust, until we can get them repaired. Hopefully the garage owner will agree to have his insurance take care of it. Prayers for that, please! Also on today’s agenda: finding the Indiana culinary specialty–the fried pork tenderloin sandwich.

The Adventure: Day 10

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Another quiet day to regroup, work, and get organized.

After breakfast, I worked in the room again. I contribute an article quarterly to an online magazine and it’s due tomorrow, so I worked on that in the morning. Dave went to Walmart for some supplies.

RALI_Indiana_Indianapolis Star

We received an email from our consultants, the PR people who schedule our events. It had all the links from all the media from Monday. And it included a picture of today’s front page of the Indy Star. With us! Above the fold!

Talk about crazy!

By 3:00, we were ready for a change of scenery, so we went back to Carmel, a town we’d driven through last week that looked so charming. We arrived about 3:30 and went immediately to the Museum of Miniatures, but they close at 4:00 and there wasn’t enough time to see everything. The docents told us to take a look around to help us decide if we wanted to come back. They were very nice and accommodating. We did take a quick look and decided we’d like to come back when we can spend at least an hour or two.

IMG_0707We headed down Main Street. One of the things that caught our attention last week was the statues scattered along the street we drove down. Walking the street let us look at them up close. TheyIMG_0709 were so cool! Life-size, and life-like. They were “people” doing mostly ordinary and everyday tasks. A policeman directing traffic. A woman with groceries. A street busker. A man reading a newspaper. Dave got the idea to take pictures of each one.

There was also a sculpture of a head.

IMG_0716I’ll let you guess whose idea this picture was. And who is behind the head. I think you can see what he’s doing …

IMG_2389We finished at Woody’s Library Restaurant for an early dinner. We shared several appetizers that were wonderful. It was a treat for me to eat in a setting surrounded by books, at a library table, on the old wood floor. It’s a unique setting and the food was excellent!

Back at the hotel, we talked to some friends on the phone, finished up miscellaneous tasks, and are headed to bed.

Tomorrow, we have an event at Fort Benjamin Harrison in Lawrence, at a farmer’s market, (4-7 PM EDT, if you’re nearby) and we’re going to check out a venue in downtown Indianapolis to see if it can accommodate the trailer. If so, we’ll be there next week.

We’re learning to be flexible!